AGENDA AT A GLANCE

DAY ONE: PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS TUESDAY, JUNE 14TH, 2016

8:30 AM

Workshop A

9:00 AM

Journey Mapping has become one of the biggest buzzwords in the CX/UX space and it means different things to different people. Saul and Justin have experimented with various methods over the years and will share a hybrid mapping methodology that has proven to turn the heads of leaders and jumpstart cultural transformations in dozens of companies. 

Attendees will walk away learning (by doing):

  • A hybrid method that brings the best of journey mapping, design thinking, and lean business model canvases
  • How to prioritize opportunities by balancing user need with business value
  • How to use this framework to inspire culture change within your company
  • Tips, tricks and lessons learned

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Workshop B

9:00 AM

When working on multi-channel experiences that blend both digital and human-to-human interfaces, service blueprints allow interaction designers to look beyond the pixels and peer into the structures and systems of touchpoints that create the service experience.

The process of discovering, designing, and weaving these touchpoints together is the core work and deliverable of service designers. Service blueprints embody the foundational concepts of service design and are a fundamental tool for clarifying the interactions between customers, digital touchpoints, employees, and 'backstage' activities (everything the customer does not see).

During this 2.5 hour workshop, you will learn about the anatomy of services and how to use service blueprints in your design practice. You will create a service blueprint documenting an existing service encounter and identify new opportunities. Utilizing this blueprint, you will explore ways of manipulating aspects of service delivery to eliminate pain-points, improve the experience, and create new process efficiencies.

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Izac Ross Collective Health
Izac Ross
Senior Designer, Service and Interaction
Collective Health

12:00 PM

Workshop A

1:00 PM

With design thinking, service design, and innovation spreading like wildfire, one of the biggest challenges that organizations today are increasingly facing is not how to do design but how to manage it. In this unique workshop, hear from the perspective of a design manager who has coached leaders in numerous organizations of varying sizes and an operations manager who has dealt with the complexity of building and scaling systems inside a design organization.

Takeaways include:

  • Training in methods we use inside our own company and in the companies of our clients
  • Review of best practices and lessons-learned from some of our own clients who manage design at-scale
  • An emphasis on heuristics for managing design teams, not just heuristics for understanding customers

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Workshop B

1:00 PM

In this workshop we will be discussing the value of seeing with the eyes of a service designer but the mind of an interaction designer. We’ll be discussing the types of design inputs startups can use to disrupt new markets and ones the enterprise should be using to disrupt themselves.

Takeaways include:

  • How to use proven design methods to identify ways of disrupting old markets into new ones
  • How to incorporate service inputs into your design process
  • An understanding of the importance of mindsets and mental models in the building of service design systems that work

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Michael Darius darius design
Michael Darius
Design Partner
darius design

4:00 PM

DAY TWO: GENERAL CONFERENCE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15TH, 2016

8:00 AM

8:45 AM

9:00 AM

Our design challenges are becoming more and more complex. Services are more interconnected across channels both digital and physical. So how do we maintain a user-centered focus in the face of increasingly complex design problems? Whether it's an expanding digital product ecosystem, a cross-channel retail experience, or a complex, intangible service experience—how do we design experiences that unfold through changing contexts? We are shifting our thinking from “products” to “systems and services” and combining talent and methods from disciplines like customer experience, service design, and user experience to design for the whole journey. What does it look like to traverse disciplines and design for people across time and space?

Takeaways include:

  • Shift our thinking from “products” to “systems and services”
  • Do away with features, and focus on touchpoints
  • Describe what it means to design experiences that unfold over time and space
  • Take the best of user experience, service design, and customer experienc
  • Understand how designing for behavior is the connection between interaction design and service design

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9:45 AM

We’re living in the “Age of the Customer,” but what does that mean? Businesses are still unsure on how to make customer experience the key differentiator that can separate them from the competition. What they often fail to realize is that customer experience is everyone’s responsibility and adopting and applying user-centric, experience design approaches across a company comes with more than a few challenges.  In this session, Saul will explain why it is so critical that everyone approaches their work with the customer at the center and what he has learned over his career as an executive leading culture change toward user-centric innovation.

 Attendees will walk away learning:

  • Why applying a user-centric approach to cultural transformation is important
  • Approaches to embed user-centered design in your company
  • Tips, tricks and lessons learned

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10:30 AM

Track A

Track B

11:00 AM

Long gone are the days when digital design meant creating apps for someone sitting upright, 18-24 inches away from a screen. Our phones are our computers. We wear our notification systems. We move through a world that plots our position and responds in different ways depending on whether we’re in a restaurant, at a bus stop, near a retailer or at home.

As a Strategist at Bottle Rocket Studios, Adam Polansky had to make adjustments from a web-centric, .com world to one that is as fluid as our movement.

Join him as he describes the processes he uses to conceptualize applications that not only take-in a screen presence but must extend to the unique ways we use technologies and the physical environments that go beyond the screen.

Some topics he’ll cover:

  • Managing user expectations to the outset
  • Mapping environments to include apps
  • Marrying on & off screen considerations
  • Less conventional ways of testing and measuring your efforts

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11:00 AM

Organizations everywhere are making the transition from products to services. With this transition comes a new set of design challenges. We must adopt a new mindset and methodology to not only create memorable and valuable service experiences for our customers, but also empower our organizations to change the way we do business for the better. But how do we grow this capacity for service design in ourselves and our organizations?

In this talk, I'll be sharing some of my journey to service design, and some of the challenges I've faced in building service design capacity in myself and my organization.

I’ll answer questions including:

  • What does it mean to be a service designer?
  • What does a service-design-minded organization look like?
  • How can you grow from UX to service design?
  • How can you find service design opportunities in your organization?

You’ll walk away with:

  • Understanding core competencies of service design
  • The difference between UX and service design
  • A perspective on service design as a career
  • Strategies for introducing service design to your organization

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Megan Erin Miller Stanford University IT
Megan Erin Miller
Senior Service Designer
Stanford University IT

11:45 AM

How do you introduce agile practices in highly regulated domains? This talk will use 18F’s ongoing partnership with the bipartisan Federal Election Commission as a case study in introducing and sustaining organizational change while navigating public scrutiny and legal mandates. We’ll walk through how we did it, what we learned, and some tools you can use right now to start designing products services more iteratively and openly — even if your stakeholders are as divided as, well, Republicans and Democrats.

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Noah Manger 18F
Noah Manger
Front-End Developer
18F
Elizabeth Goodman 18F
Elizabeth Goodman
Experience Design Lead
18F

11:45 AM

Who says Service Design should be driven by designers?

Learn through a case study about how one company is working cross-functionally to build service design thinking into it's culture through Content Strategy, and where they have been successful in the journey.

Our approach helped us in the following:

  • Defining a content strategist differs in approach from a service designer
  • Finding opportunities to expand service design in the organization
  • Leverage the skills of others to do service design for their department
  • Focusing on small wins vs. big wins

We’ll discuss:

  • Why we went with the content strategy approach
  • How it may differ in other organizations with different business models

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Patrick Neeman Apptio
Patrick Neeman
Director of Product Design
Apptio

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

Typically, the last organization to show a user focus is that of the internal IT department. While the services we offer our customers are often top-notch, the technical services offered to our internal employees are not user-focused. After attending a UX presentation at our India IT Center, one of the directors decided that there should be a change in focus for that team. He single-handedly got the ball rolling and now we are starting to see the transition from a technology-focused organization -- where they were measured on how successful a tech roll-out might be to a user-focus, where the needs of the internal users, from inception to follow-up are in the works.

This is a work-in-progress and a case study at that. If you would like to better understand the process of evolving UX in an IT organization, this session will share the story of one such evolution.

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Elisa Miller CA Technologies
Elisa Miller
Design Transformation Coach
CA Technologies

1:30 PM

In any fast-paced organization, it can be easy for teams to develop silos and quickly become out of sync. At Indiegogo, the design team addressed this by creating a visual tool to represent ongoing design work across both sides of our two-sided marketplace. This tool, called the Product Wall, brings together our customer journey, product work, and business objectives.

What started as an internal project for designers and researchers quickly evolved into a company-wide tool that has helped us to:

  • Break down silos and gain cross-team alignment
  • Facilitate discussions about product vision & strategy
  • Empower teams beyond the product organization, such as sales, customer support, and marketing, to get involved in product development

We’ll discuss:

  • How to develop the Product Wall and keep it relevant
  • Potential uses of the Product Wall

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Jamie Kong Indiegogo
Jamie Kong
Lead User Researcher
Indiegogo
Saif Romani Indiegogo
Saif Romani
Director of User Experience
Indiegogo

2:15 PM

In our connected world of tweets, posts, and check-ins, brand impressions form in unpredictable ways. By mapping the moments that lead to brand perception, we can identify and leverage touch points to tell consistent and compelling stories.  Join me for a behind-the-scenes look at how we rebranded Asana alongside our product redesign.

You'll leave this session equipped to:

  • Use journey mapping to identify brand touchpoints
  • Ensure that you're telling a consistent brand story and leveraging opportunities for brand expression
  • Develop a common language to align your team and measure success of brand goals

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Vanessa Koch Asana
Vanessa Koch
Design Manager
Asana

2:15 PM

The retail industry is at the forefront of experimentation in service and experience design. Just as retail looks to the arts for inspiration, this talk will identify three key trends in retail today, looked at from a human centered design perspective, that we believe will have impact in other categories in the near future. 

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Denise Burchell IDEO
Denise Burchell
Portfolio Director
IDEO

3:00 PM

As the most diverse on-demand services marketplace, TaskRabbit is revolutionizing everyday work by connecting Taskers with Clients across a variety of categories, such as home repair, delivery, cleaning, moving, and much more. As a two-sided marketplace, they're designing for two very distinct and different audiences so they can be the platform that removes friction from the hiring process, allowing users to easily discover, connect, communicate and process payment. This session will discuss some of the unique design challenges TaskRabbit has faced and how they've solved for them.

Design challenges to be discussed:

  • Multiple Customers
  • Locations & Devices
  • Microeconomic Influences
  • Significant Business Model Changes
  • The Ever-Changing & Unpredictable Landscape of the Sharing Economy

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John Vars TaskRabbit
John Vars
Chief Product Officer
TaskRabbit

3:00 PM

As technology companies grow and mature and begin serving a mass market—not just early adopters—the challenge of “designing for your audience” can feel like a herculean task. Attracting a vast and diverse customer base is a good problem to have, but for design teams, it creates the challenge of addressing an ever-broadening range of needs, expectations and skill levels with a single product. These issues are especially acute for onboarding experiences, when providing just the right level of guidance is critical, and the definition of “just the right level” is different for different users. We’ll share how we’ve tweaked traditional service design methods like, personas, journey maps and service blueprints, in our ongoing quest to address these challenges.

Takeaways include:

  • A framework for evaluating “fit” when it comes to designing onboarding experiences for different needs, expectations and skill levels.
  • How to use the concept of “happy paths” to prototype experiences for users—from the “novice” to the “expert.”
  • How to negotiate the disconnects when the “happy path” for your customer is at odds with the “happy path” for your company.

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Rebecca Buck Salesforce
Rebecca Buck
Lead User Experience Researcher
Salesforce
Alisa Weinstein Uber
Alisa Weinstein
Senior Design Researcher
Uber

3:45 PM

4:15 PM

Service experiences exist in many different dimensions that customers travel through as they attempt to reap the benefits from the services we are providing. Delivering service is not tied to any one touchpoint or moment; it is a collection of moments, like connecting dots that all add up to the larger value we provide – or fail to provide.

The painful, irritating moments or failures in these journeys can be difficult to pinpoint. Moments that cause pain may occur early on, but might not be felt or have an impact until much later. And neither us nor the customer can necessarily see how those dots connect holistically.

To truly deliver exceptional experiences, both the dots that make up the customer experience, and the dots that make up our organizational structure, must be connected to each other. The practical application of service design is the perfect tool for looking across the dimensions and connecting the dots in order to turn the points of pain and failure into opportunities to delight and improve how you deliver experiences.

This talk will illuminate...

  • The importance of seeing the internal and external experience
  • How service design can be applied to connect the dots
  • What it means to truly work and act end-to-end

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Erik Flowers Intuit
Erik Flowers
Principal Service Designer, Co-founder of Practical Service Design
Intuit

5:00 PM

DAY THREE: GENERAL CONFERENCE THURSDAY, JUNE 16TH, 2016

8:30 AM

9:10 AM

9:15 AM

Empathy is central to design research and service design, but what does it look like? Feel like? How does it come to be?  

Let's break it down at different stages of the design research process, from scoping through designing materials and presenting insights.

Last year, Kaiser Permanente committed a multidisciplinary, design-led team to understand the diverse needs of our transgender members and their loved ones and help KP translate these insights into quality care. The team's own genuine empathy was central to our success. With varied levels of experience with the process we cultivated empathy in multiple intentional and unintentional, organic ways.

Together we'll look at the process we used to understand what it looked like to build empathy and how that impacted the work we did.

  • For the experienced designer/researcher, you'll come away with more tips and tools that will help you build empathy in your existing processes.

  • For the less experienced, or the curious, this will give you a better understanding of what empathy can look like and how we build it intentionally and unintentionally in the work we do.

  • Everyone will come away with exposure to some inspiring design research work and a peek inside what it took to begin building empathy for a very worthy patient population within a very large healthcare company.

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10:00 AM

10:30 AM

Good news everyone! UX salaries are up! Hiring is strong!

So why are so many UX’ers still feeling like they have to fight for a seat at the grown-up table?

Is it because we’re not unicorns? That is, we're not all UX researchers, designers AND front-end developers?

Nope. That's not the reason.

Here's why: UX’ers love to explore design and solution spaces. It’s what we do. Some of us even like (or at least don’t hate) to code. It’s never been easier, with frameworks, libraries and so many proven patterns for web and mobile.

But as a community of practice, we're not so good at critical competencies such as:

  • Articulating an experience vision, aligning it with the business’s product vision, and also subtly influencing the product vision through user research dissemination.
  • Keeping up the slow, steady, often frustrating work of organizational change and alignment around user needs.


So what’s the fix? It's deceptively simple: UX practitioners need to learn to play better with our neighboring disciplines, learn to "manage up" as well as borrow some techniques from our partners in product management. We need to develop our organizational influence skills, aka soft skills.

That is, we need to:

  • Learn how to develop strategic vision and implementable tactical action plans that align with our organization's goals.
  • Internalize the fact that at least half of our job is to be change agents, and act accordingly.

Attendees of this talk will learn more about:

  • What specific soft skills UX managers are desperately looking for in their contributors.
  • How practitioners and those who train them can begin to address this need.

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11:15 AM

In a world of smart devices, smart homes, smart cars, and the looming Internet of Things, our ability to understand our customer is becoming ever more challenging. How do we measure both context and usage in this rapidly changing market?

Customers are getting smarter while their behaviors are becoming more complex. Companies today are now faced with a very harsh reality: now more than ever, their products and services must deliver real value. Creating real value requires companies to satisfy customer needs at a deeper, more meaningful level. In the past, it was enough just to understand the what; now we must get to the why in order to discover customer’s needs, perceptions, and actions.

Traditional demographics and market research use focus groups and surveys to uncover broad trends and patterns. This data is a fantastic starting place, and provides background on market segmentation and broad patterns to confirm that specific groups of people actually exist. However, this only tells part of the story. This doesn't get to the why.

Getting to the why is where the rubber meets the road and is the aim of Rapid UX Research Cycles. Rapid UX Research Cycles combine qual and quant and require a rigorous approach and process. They are shorter cycles of hypothesis-driven research to either prove or disprove a direction or an assumption that culminate with bringing the data directly to the customer. Join Kelly Goto to learn when to use them, why to use them, and how Rapid UX Research Cycles can help teams already moving in a lean or agile format get the information they need to pivot quickly.

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12:00 PM

1:00 PM

Customer Support representatives are the front line of any consumer-facing operation. They only get called when something goes wrong, so they can be a bellwether for what’s right and wrong in your organization.

John led the UX and front-end developers in the rebuild of LivingSocial’s Customer Support tools, porting them from two separate systems that didn’t talk into one integrated whole that reduced time to resolution, improved consistency of outcomes, reduced engineering time spent on resolutions, enabling customer self-resolution online, and helped set the company up to open a new, dedicated call center in Arizona.

We’ll look at the service design process that produced the CSR tool (named “Q”) as well as how better identification of problems from customers started to route through the organization, informing improvements from the consumer UX team to the deal planning group.

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John Athayde CargoSense
John Athayde
VP of Design
CargoSense

1:45 PM

The health care system is complex and currently does not fully meet the needs of people. This industry is ripe for innovation. Ironically, while there is a great need for change, the current system reinforces the types of behaviors, services, products, and experiences that contribute to a sub-optimal system. At the Center for Innovation we have developed design mindsets, methodologies, and system principles to fight the gravitational pull of the sub-optimal system.

In this session we will share examples of our work that break through the existing system and aim to transform the experience and delivery of health care.

Key takeaways include:

  • Understandings of how design can succeed in an industry that is resistive to change
  • How to experiment with new ideas within a large complex system
  • How design methodologies and activities are critical for adoption
  • How to move between a high-level vision and individual ideas

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2:30 PM

2:45 PM

The rise of big data is changing the way many of us design products and services, as we rely on increasingly data-driven tools and analysis alongside more traditional user-centered design techniques. But quantitative data only tells us part of the story, often revealing behavioral patterns but failing to capture the emotions and attitudes that shape those behaviors. How can data analysis and UX research work together to tell a more complete story, bridging the precision of data with the empathic value of research? And how can we best quantify and measure the emotional dimensions of customer experience? This talk will draw on Etsy's experiences in trying to foster a humanistic approach to experience design in a metrics-driven company culture.

Topics covered will include:

  • Harmonizing CX metrics with more traditional business metrics
  • Using data analysis to develop hypotheses for qualitative research (and vice-versa)
  • Developing alternative frameworks for "conscious capitalism"

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Alex Wright Etsy
Alex Wright
Director of Research
Etsy

3:30 PM